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20121124
20121124
Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11 (some duplicates have been removed)
in manhattan in 1967. i say that rarely in the boston public library, but i was. these are two images from my youth. we have similar images of new york and boston in the 1970s as well. the bottom image is gerald ford denying new york for a successful bailout. indeed, new york was very much headed for the trash heap of history. the city had been hemorrhaging by the thousands. it was not automobile production in detroit, it was production in new york city. and that was decimated by globalization and new technology. the city had been caught in a spiral of disorder and rising crime rate. racial conflicts just like here in boston, and the fiscal situation had gotten out of control with budgets that were far too high for the city to afford. it looked as if new york was going to go back to the weeds. like this image of jimmy carter wandering through the wasteland, and it really seemed as if the planet of the apes image of the statue of liberty rising was possible. with the cities were things that as time had come and gone, the future of the city's seemed dim because their original reason has largely
. he essentially privatize the part. now he wants to do the same thing to the boston,. that is a terrible idea. a boston journalist. so how did you save it? >> well, you have to make the park great if it s going to attract private funding. security, sanitation. whole cultural. a lot of programming to a draw people into the park at off hours. it's always safe. the best safety is not that tough security. john: the businesses aund the park to cough uphe money. and since 1996 we have not as the city government for a single dollar. john: it sounds good to me. the park looks great. what's wrong. >> well, the park looks good, but it could be better, and it could be public. john: what is so wrong with sucking money from private businesses? >> it goes intoprivate pockets. john: so what? >> is very good to use, for dan to use the public land for running a private business or rent apart where all year round there is commercial revenue from renting in up to businesses. he keeps all that money. people don't relize that. i was in the park yesterday. i walked around and did a survey
the fourth annual boston book festival, a panel entitled, what's next for women featuring anita hill, and arose in, and madeline kahn in. this is about an hour. [applause] >> good morning, everyone. such a pleasure to see you all year at what is absolutely one of my favorite advance in the city every year, the boss and books festival. i am co-host of radio boston. [applause] >> thank you very much. if you don't listen to this show i'm going to give a shameless plug. 3:00 p.m. monday through friday and, of course, very proud to be a presenting partner for boston but festival because this spirit that brings literally tens of thousands of us together on a day like this inquiry investigation exploration, love of learning and literature, it is a natural combination for the city of boston, boston but festival, and w. b. you are. i'm honored and proud to be here, especially for this panel. and before i introduce the three amazing women who are sitting to my right, a couple of quick reminders. one is that cell phones, if you have already been given that reminder, please turn them off. at the
for our panel. [applause] >> up next booktv takes you to the fourth annual boston book festival for a panel called the future of reading. this is about an hour and 15 minutes. >> good afternoon. my name is amy ryan, president of the boston public library and is an honor and pleasure to welcome you to the boston public library for the boston book festival. i would like to thank all the staff, particularly the abrupt porter, founder of the boston book festival for this amazing lineup this weekend of content rich programs. [applause] >> you can imagine my intense interest in this program, the future of reading and all of us in the library world are. i look forward to hearing your comments and what i would like to do is introduce the moderator, said campbell. [applause] >> it is my pleasure to be here today and i would like to start by thanking debbie and her team for putting on a great event. it is wonderful to spend the day here. very exciting for me to be on this particular panel because it cuts to the heart of what this event is all about, reading. and what the future of reading
be pretty terrifying, right, if it were true. a recent report from the boston consulting group says, quote, trying to hire high-skilled workers at rock bottom rates is not a skills gap. the report estimates that the skills gap actually affects between 80,000 and 100,000 workers, less than 1% of the total manufacturing workforce. the co-author of that report is also a senior and managing partner of the boston consulting group and also author of the book of "the manufacturing renaissance." thanks for stopping by to talk to us about this. i hear this a lot from executives. we've had people on this program who had people on this program who have said they just can't find the workers. you say they're not looking hard enough. they're not looking hard enough, they're not paying enough, and they're not investing in training enough. is that the answer? >> exactly. what we're seeing is companies who are not paying enough, they're looking at highly skilled jobs, they're trying to pay $12 or $15 an hour to. that's not a skills gap. they're trying to explore, you know, using lower end work force becaus
-span. but what soldiers now placed on century duty on the road in and out of boston and on guard outside the homes, officials and with british artillery now aimed at the town house of the general court, it is easy to understand why many boston residents felt threatened by the occupation. many he is how some soldiers try to stir up racial tensions in their town. not everyone in boston is white. for instance, with an -- within a month and there are rival, three british officers had been discovered encouraging some african american slaves in boston to attack their white masters. one of the stock officers assured these black bostonians that the soldiers were there to procure their freedom and that with their help and assistance, we should be able to drive all the liberty bowl is to the devil. while that slaves he talked to ignore these lies, the british army was not there to free the slaves. several white residents marched complaints -- loged complaints. >> colonial life in british occupied boston, saturday night at 8:00 eastern, part of a holiday weekend now through monday morning on c-span
begin with breaking news, a leveling buildings in springfield, massachusetts. fox 25 out of boston. officials say there was a gas leak in the area. witnesses reported windows shattering, brings flies, even a mushroom cloud rising above the epicenter of the explosion. folks say they felt and heard the boom from miles away. abulbasher of in people had significant injuries. we are told several buildings were damaged including a scores gentlemen's club right at the center of the blast. our chief fox report correspondent jonathan hunt is live with the news. we are told, jonathan, there was trouble shortly before the blast. >> yeah, john. about 4:20 eastern, this afternoon, there was, in the words of one local reporter. a real stench of gas in the several blocks surrounding what turned out to be the site of the bomb's blast in downtown springfield, massachusetts. utility workers were apparently on scene working on this. and according to that same reporter, the smell of gas had dissipated a great deal just before strangely the explosion actually happened. that was 5:30 eastern. some 90 mi
felt threatened. soldiers tried to stir up racial tension. of course, not everyone in boston is white. within a month of their arrival, three british officers are discovered encouraging african american slaves in boston to attack their white masters. one of those drunken officers assured the black bostonians that the soldiers had come to procure their freedom. with their help, they should be able to drive the liberty boys to the devil. the british army is not in boston to free the slaves. several white residents lodge complaints. captain wilson and his friends had engaged in a dangerous act to foment slave dissatisfaction. >> a discussion on how veterans are treated when returning from war. we will hear from: paul and general stanley mcchrystal, former commander of troops in -- colon powell and general stanley mcchrystal. this is about an hour-and-a- half. [applause] >> thank you for being here. this is a marvelous idea. there is an appetite in america for big ideas that unite us. >> a larger idea that we should all be thinking about is how we treat our returning veterans from the two
, sunday night at 8:00 p.m. >> with soldiers placed on a century duty on the road in and out of a boston, and on guard outside the homes of officials, and of british artillery now aimed at the townhouse, of the general court, it is easy to understand why many of felt threatened. of course not everyone in boston is white. within a month of their arrival in 1768, three british officers, probably drunk had been discovered encouraging african american slaves to attack their white masters. one of the drug officers assured the officersbostonians that the soldiers were coming to a procurer their freedoms. while of the slaves sensibly ignored these lies, the british army is not in a boston to free the slaves. several white residents launched complaints to captain wilson and is probably drug friends, engaging in a dangerous rebellion. >> tonight at 8:00 p.m. eastern, part of the holiday weekend now through monday morning on c-span 3, american history tv. >> "washington journal" continues. host: paul rothstein is a georgetown university law professor. talking about seceding from the united states.
, boston tea party and so on. and then of the american civil war. we knew almost everything about that. we had the battle of antitee tunnel and gettysburg and so on. into when i came here in 1957, i found i really knew a lot more about the revolution and the civil war than colleagues here, students and academics. but we never heard a word about the war of 1812. it was not mentioned, and it was not in our history. any idea why that should be? >> the speaker noted that he was educated in australia, and there was quite a comprehensive education on the topics of the american revolution and the american civil war but almost nothing on the war of 1812, and why might that be? well, the british did not tend to regard the american war of 1812 as a particular significant war at all. for the british, this was just a side show in the global war with napoleon. so for them the war of 1812 is not as important as the one that's happening on the european continent, so that might have something to do with what was taught in australia. but the fact of the matter is, it doesn't taught very much here either. i
Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11 (some duplicates have been removed)